Randy Poon, PhD, MBA, BComm

Randy_P
Associate Professor of Business Administration
Business Administration Program Chair
Phone:
+1 (403) 410-2000 ext. 6513
Office Location:
L2055

Education

PhD (Regent University)
MBA (University of British Columbia)
BComm (University of Calgary)

Biography

My arrival at Ambrose in 2011-2012 marked our family’s return to Calgary after spending 19 years in Ottawa. During that time, I worked for the Canadian government in a variety of federal departments, the last of which was the Department of Canadian Heritage, where I served as Director General, Strategic Policy and Management, in the Cultural Affairs Sector. While in Ottawa, my wife Kathy and I had the opportunity to serve on the leadership teams of a number of church plants. I also pastored an Alliance church in South Ottawa for two years. Prior to our time in Ottawa, I worked in Calgary as a management consultant focusing on change management and human resources. In addition, Kathy and I were also on staff with Campus Crusade for Christ in their national headquarters in Vancouver, where I served as the Director of Headquarter Operations.

We have three children, one born in each of the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario. We’re excited about the Lord’s call for us to be back in Calgary (our hometown) with family and friends and the opportunity to be part of the Ambrose community. We sense that a key part of our calling is to be used by God in the area of building and fostering authentic and close connections with others.

Current Research

My dissertation research is on the impact of securely attached and integrated leadership on follower mental health and well-being.

Individual mental health and well-being plays a significant role in the successful operation of organizations. Mental health issues within the workplace pose an increasingly greater challenge to organizations and its members. A key consideration in addressing these challenges is the role of leadership and, in particular, leader traits and attributes, and the manner in which these characteristics influence individual workplace mental health and well-being.

My dissertation proposes that Bowlby’s (1969/1982) notion of attachment, along with Siegel’s (1999, 2010) integrated “triangle of well-being,” greatly influences leader effectiveness and, correspondingly, follower mental health. I suggest that leadership’s responsibility is to then understand how these characteristics such as attachment style and integration impact those around them. The question I am seeking to address is whether a leader’s attachment style and degree of integration can facilitate a biopsychosocial sense of mental health and well-being, or sense of flourishing, in their followers.

Recent Conference Presentations

“A Model for Servant Leadership, Self-Efficacy and Mentorship,” Proceedings of the 2006 Servant Leadership Research Roundtable. Available at
http://www.regent.edu/acad/global/publications/sl_proceedings/2006/poon.pdf